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Weekend Warrior – Gardening To Dos for Memorial Day Weekend

May 23, 2009
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I do most of my gardening in the weekend, gathering tools, supplies and ideas throughout the week. Each weekend presents itself with a couple of projects, small or large, to make our plot livable, and each weekend is a step closer to a fruitful (or vegetable-full) green space.

This weekend is a three-dayer, so I have quite a bit planned.

1) Finish mulching our beds.
2) Plant a tomato plant and a couple shade flowers I got.
3) Put up a birdfeeder.
4) Figure out a viable irrigation system for a garden with no water spout (daily watering can trips can be cute, but tiresome – and the shallow watering of the watering can encrourages shallow root systems and weaker plants)
5) Sow more grass.
6) And the exciting part – making a rock path!

And here is one memorial work of art that we shouldn’t forget…

In 1969 a network of antiwar activists across the US planned the National Vietnam Moratorium, a nationwide coordinated protest against the war on Vietnam. Activist and student groups set Wednesday October 5th, 1969 as the target date for mass demonstrations. The Leo Castelli Gallery of Los Angeles commissioned Jasper Johns to create a poster for the Moratorium. The artist was famous for his pop art renditions of the American flag -works that were iconic celebrations of patriotism equally enjoyed by all citizens. But his poster for the Moratorium was a departure from his red, white, and blue paintings (from Art for Change).

In 1969 a network of antiwar activists across the US planned the National Vietnam Moratorium, a nationwide coordinated protest against the war on Vietnam. Activist and student groups set Wednesday October 5th, 1969 as the target date for mass demonstrations. The Leo Castelli Gallery of Los Angeles commissioned Jasper Johns to create a poster for the Moratorium. The artist was famous for his pop art renditions of the American flag -works that were iconic celebrations of patriotism equally enjoyed by all citizens. But his poster for the Moratorium was a departure from his red, white, and blue paintings. (From Art For Change)

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